2017 Annual Conference  |  July 13–17


Professional Development Seminars

Professional Development Seminars (PDS) are a great way to add even more value to your trip to the annual conference. These four- and eight-hour courses are designed for in-depth learning on a variety of topics. In many cases, participation in PDS can grant continuing education credits for various certifications.

Four-Hour Courses

Introduction to Institutional Biosafety Committee Management
Wednesday, July 12, 1–5 p.m.
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Kalpana Rengarajan, Emory University

Tucson Ballroom H, Lower Level

This course will cover the NIH rDNA guidelines, review of Biosafety protocols, how to manage the Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) program, GAP analysis, and continuous improvement. This course pairs well with an advanced look at IBCs being offered Thursday.
  

ACS Safety Tools for Chemistry Majors and Research
Thursday, July 13, 1–4 p.m.
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Samuella Sigmann, Appalachian State University and Ralph Stuart, Keene State University

San Ignacio, Upper Level

In 2016, the American Chemical Society released an updated web version of its Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in Research Laboratories document. The methods outlined in this document are designed to address operations in research laboratory settings, which are less defined and more changeable than those in teaching settings. This session focuses on the Job Hazard Analysis and Control Banding tools, which are appropriate for most laboratory research at the undergraduate level. Examples of lessons learned programs in the research setting will also be reviewed.
  

Periscope Depth: Active Learning in Safety Training
Friday, July 14, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Amy Orders, North Carolina State University

Tucson Ballroom I, Lower Level 

Ever wondered about the different games, tools, and instructional strategies that make training more engaging and educational? Using active learning strategies, this course will help instructors learn to use social media in classes, use learning games and tools to make class more engaged, and how to prepare interactive situations for participants to get out of the chair. In this team-taught course, participants will design several activities in the class, work in small groups, and be able to take a variety of instructional tools back to share with others on campus.
  

Strategies for Resolving Indoor Air Quality Issues
Friday, July 14, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Dennis Elmore, University of Missouri

Tucson Ballroom H, Lower Level 

Indoor air quality (IAQ) complaints can challenge even experienced investigators. It's not enough to focus on potential air pollutants; an investigator must also consider building sciences, mechanical systems, group dynamics, and at least a little bit of psychology. We will examine the issues that create and/or exacerbate IAQ problems. You will learn about pollutants, pathways, and receptors and the important roles they play in IAQ. We will also describe the hard skills required to conduct an effective investigation and the soft skills often critical to bring an issue to resolution.
  

Lab Safety 301
Friday, July 14, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Presented by the Lab Safety Community of Practice

Tucson Ballroom G, Lower Level 

Lab safety is but one component in an institution's overall safety culture and compliance efforts. Institutional compliance beyond the scope of lab safety have both direct and indirect impacts on your EHS programs. Being aware and involved in holistic compliance serves to strengthen the partnerships and outreach of EHS professionals. This interactive session will cover institutional compliance and lab safety implications, institutional compliance committees, and the implications of not being part of this bigger effort.
  

Radiation Safety for the Rest of Us
Friday, July 14, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Erich Fruchtnicht, Texas A&M University and Scott Jaqua, Portland State University
 
Arizona Ballroom 10, Lower Level

Institutions with non-health physicists responsible for radiation safety must meet the same requirements as those with health physicists. In this session, learn the basics of a radiation safety program and how it can be applied to an academic, research, or healthcare/medical research institution. This program management perspective is applicable to current and prospective radiation safety officers as well as EHS managers wanting more information about this area, and will include examples from all types of institutions.
  

Managing Respiratory Protection Programs that Work
Friday, July 14, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Dennis Terpin, University of Illinois at Chicago

Arizona Ballroom 11, Lower Level

This session provides the necessary information to develop, implement, administer, and properly sustain a respiratory protection program. All aspects of the Respiratory Protection Standard 29 CFR 1910.134 will be discussed, as well as general requirements and administrative aspects of a respiratory protection program to include training, evaluation, fit-testing, cleaning, maintenance, record keeping, and CBRNE response requirements. Specific topics include: healthcare, general industry, police, EMS, and emergency response operations.
  

How to Write Effective Standard Operating Procedures
Friday, July 14, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
David Breeding and Marianna Wood, Texas A&M University

Arizona Ballroom 12, Lower Level

Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) are an effective method of providing consistent guidance to employees. An SOP is a set of instructions or steps someone follows to complete a job safely, with no adverse impact on the environment, which meets compliance and quality standards in a way that maximizes operational requirements. Clearly written SOP's are a critical tool for safely and successfully completing any project or task. Participants will gain skill in writing SOP's and using compliant SOP templates.
  

Health and Safety Marketing for EHS Departments
Monday, July 17, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
John Covely, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Amy Orders, North Carolina State University
Tucson Ballroom B, Lower Level

EHS marketing, branding, and outreach education can function synergistically and increase the power of your health and safety message. With sound understanding of marketing theory, strategy, and brand development, you can leverage your institutional resources for increased collaboration and improvements in health and safety. Once you have their attention, employing novel outreach education and training techniques will engage the learners past the pause of required training.
  

Using Your Achieving Styles to Increase Results
Monday, July 17, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Jay Brakensiek, Claremont University Consortium

Tucson Ballroom A, Lower Level

The unique aspects of the nine measurable, statistically verifiable Connective Leadership Achieving Styles allow understanding of when styles are complementary. Video examples of Achieving Styles are shown and discussed.
  

Fire-Safe Flammable Liquid Transfer in Labs
Monday, July 17, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Megan Hall, University of California–Berkeley and Jim Gilson, University of California

Tucson Ballroom C, Lower Level

Codes require flammable liquids transfer to be fully grounded and bonded to control static-charge ignition sources seemingly regardless of volume. A cross-functional team of University of California-Berkeley's College of Chemistry, EHS Safety Engineer, and Campus Fire Marshal implemented campus-wide grounding and bonding of flammable liquids transfer from bulk-storage to lab-use-sized containers. This session will dive into low-cost equipment design and installation, test equipment and protocols, lab culture changes and user training needs, researcher concerns, and EHS audits ensuring ongoing fire safety in labs.
  

Best Practices in Field Research Safety
Monday, July 17, 8 a.m.–Noon
Member/nonmember: $265/$380
Sara Souza, University of California and Scott Patlovich, Texas Health Science Center

Tucson Ballroom D, Lower Level

This will be an interactive session to share planning and risk assessment tools, discuss lessons learned, and promote safe, successful field research. We will discuss project planning templates, common field hazards, infectious disease and biosafety considerations, outdoor leadership and wilderness first aid skills, satellite communication options, security issues and situational awareness, and emerging and neglected international risks. There will be time allotted to address topics requested by the participants and identify steps to build or expand your campus field safety program.

 

Eight-Hour Courses

Environmental 101: Environmental Regulations
Wednesday, July 12, 1–5 p.m. and Thursday, July 13 8 a.m.–Noon (8-hour course)
Member/nonmember: $410/$625
Courtney Kerr, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Steve Nelson, Auburn University, and Scott Thomaston, Emory University
Tucson Ballroom J, Lower Level

This session is designed to provide a basic survey of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations as they apply to colleges and universities. It will introduce participants to applicable 40 CFR subchapters and basic requirements for each subchapter, emphasizing the importance of determining regulatory applicability and documentation. Recent regulations and enforcement trends will also be discussed.
  

Application of Fire Codes to Laboratories
Thursday, July 13, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Member/nonmember: $430/$645 includes box lunch
John DeLaHunt, University of Texas–San Antonio

Tucson Ballroom A, Lower Level

An in-depth look at fire codes and standards, how they apply to laboratories, and how campus fire safety and laboratory safety staff can use code to prevent fire, injuries, and property damage. This session will take a deep dive on storage requirements in the model codes and how those requirements apply to new and existing construction. There will be emphasis on pre-incident planning and strategies for involving the local fire department in the campus lab safety program. This session will also include a conversation on current events and future changes to fire codes applied to laboratories.

  

Higher Education Emergency Management 101
Thursday, July 13, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Member/nonmember: $430/$645 includes box lunch
James Caesar, University of California–Santa Barbara
Tucson Ballrooom D, Lower Level 

Are you new to emergency management? Have you just been handed yet another "hat to wear?" Are you working on emergency plans or disaster preparedness for your campus? Led by two campus-based emergency managers, this session will provide a top-to-bottom overview of emergency management on a collage or university campus; how emergency management is different (yet connected to) the "typical" EHS portfolio; and offer resources and strategies for emergency management planning, preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery efforts, including continuity of operations.

  

If I'm Teaching, Why Aren't They Learning?
Thursday, July 13, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Member/nonmember: $430/$645 includes box lunch
Jonathan Klane, Arizona State University

Tucson Ballroom G, Lower Level

Many trainers become frustrated when trainees don't seem to learn or otherwise benefit from the training. In this unique session, students will participate in the learning process throughout the day. The session is designed to both educate and involve the students in the process of improving their training courses. Students will be equal participants in the day's agenda and topics. Methods and approaches to be used include demonstration, hands-on, small group work, role-playing, games, discussion, question & answer, brainstorming, and brief video clips.
  

Lab Safety 201
Thursday, July 13, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Member/nonmember: $430/$645 includes box lunch
Presented by the Lab Safety Community of Practice
 
Tucson Ballroom B, Lower Level

This session is intended to develop and improve participant’s knowledge of a comprehensive laboratory safety program. The class is framed as the life cycle of the lab. The Early Lab life will address how a lab starts, gets running, identifying what requirements are needed and establishing safe operating practices. The Middle Lab life will focus on the continuous growth of a lab, which comes with the need to maintain safe operating conditions (engineering controls, ventilation, occupational health, etc…) and manage change appropriately. Finally, the End Lab life addresses how to properly decommission a space and address concerns that arise from departing personnel and research operations. With this approach, the participants should be able to develop and maintain a comprehensive lab safety program. The class will use case studies to highlight the dynamics of a research lab at the various stages of its life.

Environmental 201: RCRA Generator Rules Unraveled
Thursday, July 13 1–5 p.m. and Friday, July 14, 8 a.m.–Noon (8-hour course)
Member/nonmember: $410/$625
Courtney Kerr, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Steve Nelson, Auburn University, and Scott Thomaston, Emory University

Tucson Ballroom J, Lower Level

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) rules for hazardous waste generators are complex and some of the most frequently cited for violations during EPA inspections. This session is designed to provide participants with a through understanding of EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Rules including the new Generator Improvement Rule, which became effective in December 2016. Participants will gain confidence in working with the hazardous waste regulations to ensure safety, prevent releases, and avoid fines and penalties. 
  

Working Safely with Nanotechnology
Thursday, July 13, 8 a.m.–5 p.m.
Member/nonmember: $430/$645 includes box lunch
David Breeding, Texas A&M University
Tucson Ballroom I, Lower Level

Nanotechnology refers to a wide range of emerging technologies that measure, manipulate, or incorporate materials between one and 100 nanometers to produce new materials, devices, and structures. Over the last few years, nanotechnology has emerged as both an opportunity and a risk in academic research laboratories. Participants in this course will learn about nanotechnology and nanomaterials; their hazards and risks; and how to assess and control workplace exposures, risk management, regulations and standards, and resources for further study.

 

 

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