Technical Sessions

Wednesday, July 27, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Nancy Eaker, Laboratory Safety Manager, Texas A&M Health Science Center
  • Gaylen Nuckols, EHS Technician, Texas A&M Health Science Center
The Texas A&M Health Science Center's College of Pharmacy in Kingsville, Texas experienced a minor lab incident in 2015 where several lab personnel (both in the lab and in nearby labs) were potentially exposed to bromine due to an improperly executed experiment. This session will discuss what happened, why it happened, the challenges encountered by EHS when working with the lab at fault, and the follow-up steps taken to reduce the risk of this type of incident happening again.
Tuesday, July 26, 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • John Covely, Public Communication Specialist, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Amy Orders, Assistant Director and Radiation Safety Officer, North Carolina State University
A campus safety culture can only be created with a comprehensive strategy of health and safety management and marketing, (policy and promotion) that impacts the entire campus, not just a portion of the campus and not just with the health and safety issues common to an EHS department. This presentation will explain how that is done by instituting an enterprise-wide health and safety marketing program.
Wednesday, July 27, 1:15-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • April Case, Sr. Safety Coordinator, University of Tennessee Knoxville
An alternative vehicle is a motor vehicle that doesn't meet the definition of a sedan, truck, pickup, or van, and their primary function is transportation. Examples include: all-terrain vehicles (Gators, Kubotas), carts, utility carts, golf carts, and segways. These vehicles are being increasingly used on college and university campuses. This session will cover the definition of alternative vehicles, the laws and regulations that govern them, and what you can do to increase awareness and reduce injury associated with the increased use of these vehicles on campuses.
Tuesday, July 26, 3-3:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • John Fellers, Director, EHS, Texas A&M Health Science Center
  • Erich Fruchtnicht, Radiation Safety Officer, Texas A&M Health Science Center
In response to an internal audit mandate, the Texas A&M Health Science Center has implemented a method for electronic inspections using iForms and developed its own method for risk assessment and data analysis. Additionally, this risk assessment and data analysis methodology have been developed by EHS staff into a visual basic-based software package that has greatly improved the efficiency of the laboratory safety and fire and life safety inspection programs. We will present on our inspection process, the risk assessment method, and on the data analysis tool developed by the Health Science Center EHS.
Tuesday, July 26, 4-4:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Maureen Malachowski, Sr. Industrial Hygienist, University of Pennsylvania
The police department is a campus group often missed in a hearing conservation program. This presentation will discuss why the police department should be included in a hearing conservation program and how program elements were implemented for the police department at the University of Pennsylvania. Discussion will include noise monitoring, how to choose the appropriate personal protective equipment for officers, and managing shift workers and a unionized workforce in a hearing conservation program.
Monday, July 25, 10:45-11:15 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Jan Eggum, Laboratory Safety Specialist, University of Kentucky
  • Amy Haberman, Director of Safety, Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering, University of Florida
Death by PowerPoint is no way to get the needed information to students, staff, and faculty. This session will highlight different methods that can be utilized in the classroom to engage the audience and help them retain the knowledge learned. The methods discussed can also be incorporated in the field. Let's make training fun again!
Wednesday, July 27, 12:30-1 p.m.

Presented by:

  • John Fellers, Director, EHS, Texas A&M Health Science Center
Have you ever wondered what those letters behind someone's name mean? What is this professional certification hoopla all about? This session will explore the many certifications offered by the BCSP, the benefits of certification, and what it takes to achieve and maintain them.
Tuesday, July 26, 4-4:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Star Scott, Green Lab Program Coordinator, University of Georgia
This session provides an insightful and thorough explanation on how to build a green lab program (GLP) from the ground up. It will cover the benefits of a GLP, the positive correlation between GLPs and safety initiatives, and the nuts and bolts of building a successful program. It will also cover a case study from the University of Georgia, as well as the benefits to housing your GLP within your safety department. Participants will leave this session with a comprehensive how-to guide for creating a GLP at their institution.
Monday, July 25, 10-10:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Andrea Voehringer, Senior Specialist, Boston University
BUUGS-Boston University Undergraduate Safety is a laboratory safety training program offered by the division of research safety of EHS for anyone instructing, teaching, or supervising an undergraduate teaching laboratory at Boston University or Boston University Medical Campus. The goals of the program are two-fold: to increase the number of observable safe behaviors in the undergraduate teaching laboratories by exposing the next generation of scientists to proper modeling techniques, and to strengthen the long-term culture.
Tuesday, July 26, 3-3:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Ryan Lisk, Laboratory and Chemical Safety Manager, Georgia Institute of Technology
In 2014, Georgia Tech Facilities Management formed a sustainability committee. During their first year, they engaged with the office of campus sustainability to design and pilot the Work Green program, which uses Green Champions to foster a culture of workplace sustainability through behavior change strategies. This presentation will focus on how the program was developed and lessons learned from the pilot study. It will also highlight key features of an effective pilot, including critical feedback mechanisms and components of a strong communication plan.
Monday, July 25, 10:45-11:15 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Jerey Lebowitz, Director of Development, Jensen Hughes
  • Mark Murray, Assistant Director, University of Washington
Highrise and other large laboratory buildings, though common to college campuses, are challenging to design and operate. The International Fire Code strictly limits the aggregate quantity of hazardous (chemical) material storage, particularly on upper floors of a building. In some jurisdictions the local fire department may apply the code retroactively, which can present a significant challenge to comply in existing buildings. This presentation will address lab planning, construction and operational considerations, and provide an overview of potential change to the International Fire Code.
Tuesday, July 26, 1:45-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Julie King, Safety Specialist, Rice University
Capturing and recording near misses in academic laboratories can be difficult. Near-miss incidents are hard to define, but are generally considered incidents that do not result in a loss. The requirements for reporting a near miss can often be unique to the hazards in the laboratory, and these differences often result in under reporting. However, recording and investigating near misses can lead to better understanding of the hazards present and help to avoid injury-causing accidents in the future.
Wednesday, July 27, 10:30-11:15 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Bruce Backus, Asst. Vice Chancellor EH&S, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Brad King, Director, Occupational Safety, Washington University in St. Louis
This case study reviews a hydrogen fire incident that occurred in an engineering laser and electronics laboratory, which resulted in a minor injury and fire sprinkler water flooding of the building. The James Reason "Swiss Cheese Model of Accident Causation" is used to explain the many elements that contributed to the incident. These elements can be used as a guide for attendees to assess their own institution's research use of flammable gas cylinders.
Tuesday, July 26, 1:45-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Kyle Angjelo, Program Manager, Chemical, Princeton Unviersity Environmental Health & Safety
Princeton University EHS liaises with science departments to establish department-level chemical hygiene plans. Asking researchers to document activity specific SOPs and risk assessments is challenging. Methods to increase compliance, add value, and minimize burden will be discussed. Bridging the gap between a compliance document and a useful laboratory tool will be emphasized.
Tuesday, July 26, 3-3:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Dorothy Haskett, Systems Analyst Senior, Arizona State University
  • Steven Hunter, Associate Director of EH&S, Arizona State University
Last year, Arizona State University presented on the integration of chemical purchases directly into the university's chemical inventory database. Part two of that process is categorizing the chemicals ordered according to ICC, DHS, OSHA, and others hazards either before or as they are placed into the individual's chemical inventory. Once categorized, chemicals automatically go into the researcher's inventory the next time they are ordered. Topics discussed in this session will include challenges to database integration and strategies for classifying chemicals.
Monday, July 25, 2-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

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  • Maureen Kotlas, Director, Environmental Health and Safety, University of Maryland Baltimore
When cities experience periods of civil unrest, campuses may be impacted as a result of proximity to the events. While protests and demonstrations are often peaceful, they can escalate into a less controlled or even violent situation. In some cases, protests last for days or re-emerge at a future time. This session will consist of a panel of representatives from institutions that have experienced civil unrest on or near their campuses. The panelists will explain the circumstances, how the situation was managed, and provide the lessons learned. Time will be provided for audience questions.
Tuesday, July 26, 4-4:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Ingrid Castro-Rodriguez, Chemical Hygiene Officer, UC Berkeley-Office of Environment, Health and Safety
  • Brandon DeFrancisci, Associate Director for Health and Safety, UC Berkeley-Office of Environment, Health and Safety
  • Gaelle Deshayes, Chemistry Safety Specialist, UC Berkeley-Office of Environment, Health and Safety
The University of California-Berkeley office of EHS organized an activity to examine the comfort and dexterity described by researchers during normal research activities while using several combinations of gloves and liners. Three combinations of chemical-resistant and flame-resistant gloves and liners were evaluated. The evaluation included simulated attempts to manipulate small objects, similar to what may be required during the transfer of an air/moisture sensitive liquid. Researchers were asked to rank each task and glove combination on a five-point scale. The flame-resistant/nitrile combination was the top choice.
Wednesday, July 27, 1:15-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Bruce Backus, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enivonmental Health and Safety, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Daniel Szatkowski, Health Physicist, Washington University in St. Louis
Residents of a St. Louis suburb seek answers to their concerns. It is a complicated situation, as one landfill reports it has an underground fire burning while a neighboring landfill has radioactive waste. As a leading eduational institution in our community, what is our role in this debate?
Tuesday, July 26, 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Phyllis Carter, EHS Officer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Niamh Kelley, EHS Officer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
MIT announced a new nanoscience and nanotechnology building for research and instruction slated for 2018. But in the way was a 75-year-old material science building in the heart of the campus. The MIT EHS team worked with facilities construction project management in building assessment, testing, planning, and remediation of the building comprised of typical asbestos, lead building materials, and a complicated wastewater conveyance system with mercury and PCB contamination.
Tuesday, July 26, 3-3:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Harjinder Sardar, Biosafety Officer/Alternate Responsible Official, Oregon Health and Science University
Many compliance based programs are auditing laboratories throughout the academic year. Combining these audits into one program can be a challenge. During this session, we will go over the logistics behind making it work, cross-training employees, various communication pathways to explore, effective rollout, identifying areas for improvement, providing various avenues for feedback, criticality of administrative help, how to close the loop, and successfully combining various audit programs that were once done independently.
Monday, July 25, 12:45-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Brett Berg, Health and Safety Specialist, Northwestern University
In July 2015, the office for research safety at Northwestern University conducted a series of full-scale emergency HAZMAT drills with the regional HAZMAT response team and local police and fire departments. This presentation will review the planning, communication, and teamwork needed to facilitate drills of this magnitude. Additionally, it will summarize the event, highlight lessons learned, and provide recommendations for future drills.
Tuesday, July 26, 3-3:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Bill Garner, Health Physicist, University of Kentucky
  • Jay Young, College Safety Officer , University of Ky College of Arts and Sciences
Radioactive sealed sources, cryogenic liquid, and laser usage all have regulatory and safety issues associated with them. This session will review the licensing, receipt, setup, and oversight by the radiation safety office and College of Arts and Sciences safety officer for an experiment where the three modalities are used in one experiment.
Monday, July 25, 2-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Jan Eggum, Lab Safety Specialist, University of Kentucky
  • Amy Haberman, Director of Safety, University of Florida - Herbert Werthiem College of Engineering
Participants will contribute to and learn from a live discussion session of relevant lab safety topics that affect the lab safety community. Members will be surveyed prior to conference to determine interest in various topic areas and to identify subject matter experts. This session will provide opportunity to do breakout/roundtable case studies to tackle real-world issues of our community and provide problem resolution for them to take back to their campus.
Tuesday, July 26, 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Ralph Stuart, Chemical Hygiene Officer, Keene State College
In response to ongoing public and professional concern with laboratory chemical safety practices, EHS professionals are partnering with chemistry librarians and information professionals to provide more useful chemical safety information through a variety of web platforms. This presentation will discuss the strengths and limits of these resources and consider how they can be best used to support and train laboratory workers in both teaching and research settings.
Monday, July 25, 12:45-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Bruce Backus, Assistant Vice Chancellor Environmental Health & Safety, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Louis DiBerardinis, EHS Director, MIT
  • Peter Schneider, EHS Director, UMass Boston
In January 2016, the Campus Consortium for Environmental Excellence (C2E2) hosted a workshop on the safe use of drones on campus and in field research. Existing campus policies and procedures were reviewed and discussed, as well as the Federal Aviation Administration rule-making. This session will summarize the workshop discussion and guidance for the safe use of unmanned vehicles for higher education.
Monday, July 25, 3-4 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Jay Brakensiek, Environmental Health and Safety Manager, Claremont University Consortium
  • Nayan Shah, MD, Staff Physician, Claremont University Consortium
Ebola made international headlines as international patients began to be diagnosed with the illness. With travel common on a college campus, it was critical to make plans in the event that a patient in our Student Health Services Clinic was diagnosed with Ebola. This work was led by our physicians at student health services. As EHS manager, I was asked to provide guidance on the latest CDC procedures and personal protective equipment. This presentation will go over the planning, preparations, and exercises completed, along with the challenges overcome.
Wednesday, July 27, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Christina Tabor, Senior Health Physicist, Georgia Tech
How many people visit your website each day, and how does it look on a phone? Are you meeting Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility requirements for your website? How many people actually open your email newsletter, and which stories do they read? Learn how to answer these questions and discover new ways of reaching your customers. Georgia Tech's recent website redesign and other communications initiatives will be highlighted.
Wednesday, July 27, 1:15-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Brandy Nelson, Biological Safety Officer, University of Kentucky
  • Eric Rouse, Senior Biological Safety Specialist, University of Kentucky
Recent laboratory acquired infections highlight the role of Risk Group (RG) 2 microbiological agents in illnesses resulting from lab exposures. Many institutions have invested heavily in hazard communication and occupational health programs for RG3 and RG4 pathogens. This same level of effort does not always transfer to RG2 agents. The University of Kentucky department of biosafety has developed programmatic elements to address the need to inform personnel working with RG2 agents of the signs and symptoms of infection and provide for timely response in the event of an exposure.
Monday, July 25, 10-10:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Sara Souza, Research Safety Specialist, UC Berkeley EH&S
We will tackle specific challenges inherent to field work, such as limited communications and medical services, driving safety, extreme weather, zoonotic and vector-born diseases, as well as training, leadership skills, emergency plans, and situational awareness. We will share lessons learned from previous field incidents and experience from training outdoor workers on new California heat illness regulations, funding wilderness first aid training for field researchers, and other outreach efforts that may help you build a stronger field safety program on your campus.
Monday, July 25, 10-10:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • John DeLaHunt, Risk and Life Safety Manager, The Unioversity of Texas at San Antonio
  • Lorenzo Sanchez, Director, Business Continuity and Emergency Management, The University of Texas at San Antonio
The University of Texas-San Antonio runs fire drills in academic buildings during class sessions. We will explain how we have established this program and how we mitigate the substantial pushback.
Monday, July 25, 12:45-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Robert Bollinger, PhD, PE, President, Micro-Waste Corporation
  • Patrick Wolf, Assistant Director, EHS, University of Maryland, Baltimore
In order to replace a 20-year-old incinerator that no longer met the EPA emissions requirements, the University of Maryland-Baltimore procured a Micro-Waste Disposal Unit. This presentation will discuss how the university evaluated options and ultimately selected this technology, as well as discuss how it has met operational objectives after five years of operation.
Wednesday, July 27, 1:15-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Alisha Sutton, Environmental Specialist, George Mason University
When it comes to hazardous waste management in a university setting, the process is as much about herding cats as it is about compliance. Hazardous waste exists across an array of departments, shops, and labs. It is the goal of the hazardous waste manager to ensure all of the waste is managed in accordance with applicable regulations. Developing a full picture of your campus takes time and the ability to talk to a diverse group of personnel. Achieving compliance requires maintaining these relationships and being able to think on your feet while juggling. You can do it, with a village.
Tuesday, July 26, 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Timothy J. LaRose, VP Development, Education, JENSEN HUGHES
  • Jeremy Lebowitz, Director Developmentc, JENSEN HUGHES
In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the construction of new STEM facilities on higher education campuses. Within that category of STEM buildings include many that contain high-hazard contents. Typically, these spaces are not properly designed to accommodate the program space needs and are often under protected or improperly protected from fire. Do you know if the high-hazard storage spaces on your campus are properly protected from fire? There is not a one-size-fits-all solution for every high-hazard space. Let us help you ask the right questions to know the answer.
Wednesday, July 27, 1:15-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Matt Moustakas, Director of Environmental Health & Safety, Texas Woman's University
National Fire Protection Association 101 Life Safety Code assembly occupancy requirements for tables, chairs, and non-fixed chairs can be confusing, especially for those coordinating events in a flexible space. Ensuring adequate egress width is critical to fire safety when dealing with non-fixed furniture. Historic buildings used for conferences and other events can be particularly challenging. Texas Woman's University EHS staff will discuss how they managed this issue by using commonly available tools such as spreadsheets and computer-aided design, as well as share some of the management strategies that have worked well on their campus.
Monday, July 25, 10:45-11:15 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Dan Panico, Health & Safety Officer, Arizona State University
  • John Svenson, Health & Safety Officer, Arizona State University
Arizona State University (ASU) is one of the largest universities in the United States and is growing significantly each year. It currently enrolls over 80,000 students, employs over 25,000 faculty and staff, and contains more than 1,500 research and teaching laboratories. Beginning in 2015, the EHS department at ASU implemented a new lab inspection strategy. This presentation will discuss the results of our new strategy, the successes we achieved, and the challenges we faced, as these have implications for improvement in other lab safety programs and training.
Wednesday, July 27, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Dennis Nolan, Assistant Director, EHS, The University of Texas at Austin
Until 2013, the University of Texas-Austin's Organic Chemistry Teaching Labs did not require the use of lab coats; students had to provide their own coats or request one. After several serious incidents in research laboratories, EHS convinced the organic chemistry lab manager to pilot a lab coat program. After considering the issues between purchasing, leasing, and requiring students to purchase their own coats, organic chemistry decided to pilot a leased lab coat program. The pilot went well and the program was expanded to all chemistry teaching labs a year later.
Wednesday, July 27, 12:30-1 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Amy Haberman, Director of Safety, University of Florida
Participants will learn the aspects of creating and administering an effective safety incentive program. Amy will share her experience in creating and deploying a successful incentive program at the Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery. Program aspects to be outlined include development of the logistics, identifying behaviors or compliance objectives to target, promoting changes in behavior, communication of the program, choosing the incentive and determining the winner, and measuring overall effectiveness of the program.
Wednesday, July 27, 10:30-11:15 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Imke Schroeder, Research Project Manager , UC Center for Laboratory Safety
As part of its mission, the University of California Center for Laboratory Safety (UCCLS) has conducted research on accidents at UCLA. Campus incidents were analyzed with respect to departments where they occurred in order to set research laboratory-related accidents in perspective. Lab accidents were categorized by types of accidents, rates of occurrence, and where they occurred. Select accidents were highlighted as lessons learned. The results illustrate deficiencies that could be addressed through improved researcher training and an overall improvement of the safety culture in labs.
Monday, July 25, 2-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Petko Ivanov, Biological Safety Specialist, Rice University
Autoclaves are ubiquitous instruments in both a healthcare and university setting. Researchers depend on autoclaves in order to conduct their research and dispose of biological and biohazardous waste. Ensuring that autoclaves are functioning properly requires coordination from EHS, facilities, and research staff. Autoclaves must not only function within the manufacturer parameters, but must also adhere to federal, state, and local guidelines. The challenges associated with initiating an autoclave monitoring program are magnified in a small university with an extensive research commitment.
Tuesday, July 26, 4-4:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Nancy Eaker, Laboratory Safety Manager, Texas A&M Health Science Center
  • Erich Fruchtnicht, Radiation Safety Officer, Texas A&M Health Science Center
In 2015, EHS was directed to validate the decontamination of potentially contaminated lab equipment when it was sent to surplus for auction. EHS designed a comprehensive equipment decon validation policy only to have it rejected by administration and replaced with their vision of how the process should work. This session describes the challenges faced by Health Science Center EHS in designing a program that manages what was a very cumbersome problem, and then having to start over and redesign around directives given by administrators without EHS expertise and additional resources.
Tuesday, July 26, 4-4:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • John Fellers, Director, EHS, Texas A&M Health Science Center
You're in charge! Now what? This session will introduce a method of leadership developed through the speaker's own education and experience, which he employs in building and leading a high-performing EHS team. This method, coined "R.I.G.H.T.," will provide a framework for both current and future leaders to effectively get the job done.
Monday, July 25, 2-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Michael Labosky, Assistant to the Director, MIT
Many campuses are regularly undergoing numerous renovation and construction projects. EHS departments have several key considerations for spaces where their input and evaluation should be included. If you are in a program where you have a seat at the project table for design and construction, how do you make the most of it? This presentation will highlight some of the current efforts at MIT as we embark on unprecedented levels of projects on our campus, as well as provide ideas on what might be considered when trying to improve your own programs.
Monday, July 25, 12:45-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Harjinder Sardar, Biosafety Officer/Alternate Responsible Official, Oregon Health and Science University
Managing safety for ABSL2+ projects is always a challenge due to lack of clarity on safety practices and insufficient higher containment space. Thereby, risk assessments become essential before implementing ABSL3 practices within ABSL2 spaces for executing these research studies. This session will focus on a couple of case studies involving ABSL2+ agents.
Tuesday, July 26, 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Robin Izzo, Director, Princeton University
In February 2015, an undergraduate student was diagnosed with measles. A quick epidemiological study suggested that more than 1,000 faculty and staff and even more students could have been exposed. Working with public health officials, the university was required to have records showing that each person potentially exposed was either protected or quarantined. Five students were quarantined on campus and more than 20 faculty and staff were quarantined in their homes for more than a week. Hundreds of employees were out of work for 2-3 days to prove immunity. The university held a titer clinic.
Monday, July 25, 2-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Jill James, Company Representative, Vivid Learning Systems
  • Matt Roe, Assistant Vice President, Texas Tech University
Universities face training challenges as unique and diverse as any campus population. The complexity associated with documentation of training records remains an unsettling problem for many institutions concerned with real liability and risk. With a staggering abundance of regulatory requirements and overseeing entities to satisfy--from OSHA to the Chemical Safety Board and everything in between--it is imperative that universities examine pre-existing record keeping practices with the same critical perspective assumed by governing agencies in the event of an accident or audit.
Monday, July 25, 3-4 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Peter Schneider, EHS Director, UMass Boston
This session, limited to 40 participants, will begin with a presentation on basic negotiating theory and approaches. The majority of the session will consist of small group role playing exercises. Participants will play the role of campus EHS director and an EPA or OSHA regulator.The scenario is a follow-up to a campus inspection designed to settle penalties and corrective actions. Following the exercise, participants will share observations and lessons learned with the full group.
Monday, July 25, 10-10:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Jay Frerotte, DIrector, EH&S, University of Pittsburgh
The University of Pittsburgh has an urban campus with more than 100 buildings. The university's multipurpose facility, the Petersen Events Center, is home to a student recreation facility, auxiliary gymnasium, retail food court, and a 12,500 seat arena. The facility serves as the long-term sheltering site for nearly every building on campus. This presentation will examine the steps the university implemented to prepare a more robust plan to shelter individuals in the Petersen Events Center during an emergency. The planning process culminated in a table-top exercise that provided additional insight.
Wednesday, July 27, 10:30-11:15 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Ryan Lisk, Laboratory and Chemical Safety Manager, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Anita McLean, Research Category Manager, Kimberly-Clark Professional
Want to enhance your lab safety culture? Georgia Tech and Kimberly-Clark Corporation will review their journeys in reducing incidents and how collaboration is key. Learn the human behavior behind why accidents occur, tactics for changing the behavior, personal protection equipment selection tips, and best practices for building a breakthrough culture.
Wednesday, July 27, 12:30-1 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Markus Schaufele, Director - Evanston, Northwestern University
Safely working with concentrated nitric acid, aqua regia, or piranha solutions in the presence of organic materials presents a unique challenge. Incompatibility reactions can be quite harmful. Many chemical waste disposal incidents in laboratories involve incompatible mixtures of nitric acid. Newly developed safety communication and videos address training gaps.
Monday, July 25, 3-4 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Loka Mistretta, Higher Education Strategic Markets, Cintas
This session will bring the participant up to speed on new trends in selecting and maintaining appropriate personal protective equipment in lab environments, biological and animal research, and maintenance and power plants on campus. Specific focus will be provided on maintaining compliance with regulatory bodies and designing compliance with regards to high employee satisfaction as well.
Tuesday, July 26, 1:45-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Francis Churchill, Assistant Director for Health & Safety, University of Vermont
  • Elayna Mellas-Hulett, Laboratory Safety Professional, University of Vermont
Chemical exposures in the gross anatomy lab can be difficult to control where it is often thought that expensive ventilation solutions, such as downdraft tables, are the only answer. Formaldehyde is a volatile chemical found in most embalming solutions that can lead to elevated exposures during class. Employers who have staff working with formaldehyde must abide by the OSHA standard; however, many industries now strive for the lowest feasible exposure rather than focusing on OSHA permissible exposure limits. Using a number of work practice controls, the levels of formaldehyde were reduced to acceptable levels.
Tuesday, July 26, 4-4:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Phil Numoto, Occupational Health and Safety Specialist, University of Washington
The University of Washington provides dental care services at three facilities. On occasion, a dental patient requires administration of nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide exposure monitoring was conducted at each facility and corrective actions were taken to reduce exposures. This session will review the changes made for anesthesia machine preventive maintenance, nitrous oxide mask selection, patient preparation for gas administration, and work practices that affect exposures.
Wednesday, July 27, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Greg Kwolek, Associate Manager for Research Safety Programs, Columbia University
How many times have you gone looking for a specific chemical but didn't even know where to start? Well, with an effective implementation of radio frequency indentification (RFID) technology, you can wave that problem goodbye and truly start to actively manage your chemical inventory. During this session, we will review the implementation of RFID technology for chemical container tracking at Columbia University. We will present the benefits and challenges associated with RFID technology, conduct a hands-on hardware demo, and demonstrate how it can save you time and money over a traditional optical barcode-based system!
Wednesday, July 27, 12:30-1 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Mary Beth Koza, Director-EHS, UNC-CH
Every EHS professional needs to understand the components of risk communication to effectively communicate during an emergency. This presentation will define risk communications, the life cycle of risk communication, and the preparation needed to handle an emergency communications event. Upfront planning is a critical element, and knowing the designated roles of the individuals involved is essential.
Tuesday, July 26, 3-3:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Amy Haberman, Director of Safety, University of Florida
Amy will discuss her role as director of safety serving the College of Engineering at the University of Florida; a non-traditional role residing outside of campus EHS. During the sessions, she will cover initiatives and results so far. Other universities should gain an understanding of how to leverage college or departmental administrative support to positively affect change in their safety performance and culture.
Monday, July 25, 10-10:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Robin Izzo, Director, Princeton University
Safety training is necessary to help our campus community understand risks and how to mitigate them. However, it is only half the battle. In order to improve safety culture, members of our campus community need to understand what to do when they see an unsafe act, when they feel pressured to do something they feel is unsafe, etc. Most of us try not to be the "safety police," but we all need to conduct inspections. Soft skills and interviews can help to improve the relationship between EHS and the campus community, uncover problems and best practices, and improve safety culture.
Tuesday, July 26, 3-3:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Ethan Martin, Environmental Health Specialist / Respiratory Protection Program Coordinator, University of Colorado Denver
Respiratory protection programs (RPP) are critical in preventing occupational exposures to hazardous materials. However, inefficiencies in a respiratory protection program diminish return on work output and frustrate both employees and clients. As such, a program evaluation was conducted to streamline the Colorado University-Denver RPP. Due to the complicated nature of the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard 29 CFR 1910.134, potential compliance gaps will be discussed. The audience will be polled to determine what aspects of the OSHA standard and which changes to the Colorado University program they are most interested in learning.
Wednesday, July 27, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Presented by:

  • James Crandall, EHS Assistant Director, Weill Cornell Medicine
Weill Cornell Medicine Environmental Health and Safety leverages its information systems to support day-to-day operations and generate researcher-specific report cards. This comprehensive report card provides a multi-hazard assessment, reviews past performance, and helps EHS staff target laboratory inspections to the higher risk operations and historical poor performance issues in the laboratory. EHS staff are more efficient and effective at completing laboratory inspections and minimizing disruption to laboratory operations. Laboratory managers use this as a self-assessment tool.
Monday, July 25, 12:45-1:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Emma Alder, Health and Safety Specialist, University of Washington
Safety professionals understand the importance of a root cause analysis when investigating accidents. An academic institution's size can make it difficult, if not impossible, for the institution's safety professionals to investigate all accidents. Supervisors or other university representatives often step in to file the accident report and complete the investigation. This session will present an overview of a root cause analysis training developed at the University of Washington to improve the accident investigations done outside of the EHS department.
Tuesday, July 26, 1:45-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Matt Fragala, Practice Director, Education & Commercial, Environmental Health & Engineering, Inc.
  • Jan-Arthur Utrecht, Director of Environmental Health & Safety, University of Cincinnati
Part two of a case study chronicling the demolition of a University of California lab building. Hazardous materials identified in the building in 2015 prompted concerns of potential exposure during demolition. A program was implemented to mitigate exposures and manage communications. The key to the program's success was real-time environmental monitoring, which alerted the project team of issues before they became a problem and prevented project delays. With demolition now complete, the presenters will share project data and provide insight into a successful control strategy.
Monday, July 25, 3-4 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Elena Capsuto, Assistant Director, The University of Texas at Austin
Theatrical productions have been entertaining people for centuries. They create a live entertainment that engages the audience. The audience sees the final result, but not all the effort that goes into the production. Theaters involve many of the occupational safety programs that OSHA lists each year as having the most frequently cited safety violations. This presentation will examine how these programs are employed in the theater setting, the unique risks present in a theater, and how to mitigate these risks.
Monday, July 25, 3-4 p.m.

Presented by:

  • John DeLaHunt, Risk and Life Safety Manager, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • J. Brian Moroney, Director of Environmental Health, Safety and Risk Management, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Kristee Phelps, Occupational Health and Wellness Manager, The University of Texas at San Antonio
The CDC-NIOSH Total Worker Health® program was initiated in 2011 with the stated goal of integrating occupational safety and health protection with health promotion to prevent worker injury and illness, as well as to advance health and well-being. This session will review how the elements of the Total Worker Health® program have been integrated at the University of Texas-San Antonio.
Tuesday, July 26, 8:30-9:30 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Christopher Mize, Radiation Safety Officer, Rice University
The nature of today's research climate demands a radiation safety program for small universities to stay competitive. Implementing a radiation safety program involves more than just submitting an application. Appropriate funding, university administrative support, and knowledgeable personnel can mean the difference between a successful program and violations on your next inspection. We will cut through the red tape and stacks of regulations and discuss the true cost of a radiation safety program.
Tuesday, July 26, 1:45-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Tolga Durak, Director, Environmental Health & Safety, Oklahoma State University
The Oklahoma State University (OSU) EHS department led 20 academic programs from three different colleges into forming the OSU Fire Council, an OSU system-wide organization dedicated to advancing fire-related missions, programs, and practices. The OSU Fire Council was established to accomplish its work through an interdisciplinary and collaborative approach to education, research, and outreach. Participants can expect to gain a better understanding of the opportunities that might be available as a result of such campus academic partnerships. The presenter will discuss the path to establishing the partnership, the mission, and the vision, as well as the resulting benefits that provided a significant financial support for EHS programs.
Monday, July 25, 10:45-11:15 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Jim Gilson, Senior Safety Engineer, University of California
We will explore the University of California's Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) program mobile app and online management tool developed by the university 18 months ago. Program successes, problems, and lessons learned include a review of the paper-based LOTO procedure development process and adapting it to mobile app technology; how mobile apps integrate LOTO into most UC operations; technology training and adoption challenges by user groups; how mobile app data management gives LOTO managers a powerful tool; and lessons learned from developing a mobile app management system for EHS compliance and risk reduction need.
Wednesday, July 27, 10:30-11:15 a.m.

Presented by:

  • Dennis Nolan, Assistant Director, EHS, The University of Texas at Austin
The University of Texas-Austin has partnered with Exxon-Mobil for several years to improve laboratory safety at the university. This partnership was intended to benefit both the university and Exxon, and has improved the culture of laboratory safety in both teaching and research laboratories. This presentation will describe the impetus of the partnership, how it was implemented, and the benefits of a partnership with private industry.
Wednesday, July 27, 12:30-1 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Shaundree Davis, Senior Program Manager, Industrial Hygiene, Princeton University
  • John Martini, Senior Maintenance Technician, Princeton University
  • James McQuaid, Senior Program Manager, Health & Safety, Princeton University
In an effort to improve employee engagement in safety within the facilities operations group at Princeton University, EHS and facilities partnered to develop a program where workers provide safety training to their peers. Research has shown that information delivered through the peer-to-peer vehicle can be viewed as more credible and effective by the receiver than information delivered from a non-peer. This session will outline how the program was developed and highlight its current progress from the perspective of the workers conducting the peer training.
Monday, July 25, 2-2:45 p.m.

Presented by:

  • Ed Garibian, CEO, eRPortal Software Group
This session will show how any mobile device – iPad, iPhone, or Android phone or tablet can be used as the base platform for managing materials inventory control, tracking of chemicals throughout a campus, and the managing and reporting of any array of substances from cradle-to-grave.

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